Size of Brain Region May Impact How Well Exposure Therapy Works for PTSD | 

New research suggests that PTSD patients with a larger region of the brain that helps distinguish between safety and threat are more likely to respond to exposure-based therapy. The study expands upon prior research that discovered having a smaller hippocampus is associated with increased risk of PTSD. In the current study, researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and New York State Psychiatric Institute (NYSPI), examined the relationship between hippocampus volume, and response to treatment in 50 participants with PTSD and 36 trauma-exposed healthy controls. The volume or size of the hippocampus was measured with magnetic resonance imaging. The participants were evaluated at baseline and after 10 weeks, during which time the PTSD group had prolonged exposure therapy. Exposure therapy is a type of cognitive-behavioral therapy that has been shown to help patients with PTSD discriminate between real and imagined trauma. The study, published online in Psychiatry Research:

Source: Size of Brain Region May Impact How Well Exposure Therapy Works for PTSD | Psych Central News