Basic Science (emphasis on basic) behind Trauma Informed Work

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Western science generally separates the human mind into two broad categories; the conscious mind and the subconscious mind. The conscious mind is responsible for things like short-term memory, logical and analytical thinking, and decision making (as in thinking on one’s feet); it is the part of our mind of which we are aware. The subconscious mind holds long-term memory, belief systems, associations, perceptions (and a whole lot more) and is the part of our mind that is, well, not so accessible. The conscious mind is able to process about 40 bits of information per second while the subconscious mind is believed to process upwards of 40 million bits per second. The take away here is not how many “bits” of information an average conscious or subconscious mind can process per second (after all, what constitutes a “bit” of information  depends on an operational definition). The take away is the phrase “a whole lot.” The unconscious mind processes information a whole lot faster than the conscious mind (see “emphasis on basic” in above title).

“Why should I care about my subconscious mind and what does it have to do with trauma?”

Our conscious and subconscious minds process information very differently and without training, do not communicate with one another effectively. When we are stressed, our subconscious minds take over and we lose partial (or complete) access to our more conscious processes. This is how our subconscious mind doing its job.

Our subconscious mind has evolved to keep us safe. When we feel unsafe (and it is largely our unconscious mind that makes this determination) we transition into a more defensive state of consciousness that can feel like wariness on one end of a spectrum to a state of complete overwhelm known as fight or flight, on the other. The degree to which we our subconscious mind takes over and we move to the fight/flight end of the continuum is commensurate with access to our conscious mind – the more we transition into fight/flight, the less access we have to our conscious processes.

 

 

 

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